UAEM Brasil signs civil society letter to the indian IPR Think TankA UAEM Brasil assina a carta da sociedade civil ao IPR Think Tank indianoUAEM Brasil firma la carta de la sociedad civil al IPR Think Tank

letter_Global_IP_and_access_to_medicines_India_IP_Think_Tank_pdf__página_1_de_3_The recently formed IPR Think Tank will have the task of identifying good practices and strategic policy spaces for intellectual property in India. Civil society groups have written, and organizations of the global access to medicines and health community endorse, a letter to the think tank requesting that India’s leading role in the developing world regarding IPRs is taken into consideration. UAEM Brasil signs it and supports the initiative for the reasons exposed in the letter. Read it below:

letter_Global_IP_and_access_to_medicines_India_IP_Think_Tank_pdf__página_1_de_3_O recém-formado IPR Think Tank será responsável por identificar boas práticas e áreas estratégicas da propriedade intelectual na Índia. Grupos da sociedade civil redigiram, e a comunidade global de organizações que trabalham com saúde e acesso a medicamentos assinam, uma carta ao think tank rogando-lhes que levem em conta a posição de vanguarda que o país ocupa na política de propriedade intelectual dentre os países em desenvolvimento. A UAEM Brasil assina a carta e apoia a iniciativa pelos motivos expostos na carta. Leia abaixo a versão traduzida independentemente pelos UAEMers ou acesse o texto ou o pdf do original em inglês, aqui.

letter_Global_IP_and_access_to_medicines_India_IP_Think_Tank_pdf__página_1_de_3_

El recién-formado IPR Think Tank será responsable por identificar buenas prácticas y áreas estratégicas de la propiedad intelectual en Índia. Grupos de la sociedad civil escribieron, y organizaciones de la comunidad global de acceso a medicamentos y salud firman, una carta al think tank rogándoles que tengan en cuenta la posición de vanguarda de Índia en términos de propiedad intelectual entre los países en desarrollo. UAEM Brasil apoya la iniciativa por las razones expuestas en la carta. Lea abajo la versión traducida independentemente al portugués por UAEMers o accese el texto o el pdf del original en inglés, aquí.

Re: intellectual property and access to medicines

We write to the newly constituted IPR Think Tank as patient groups, public interest organisations, treatment providers and academia world-wide to raise critical issues around the intellectual property system in India. We hope that the Think Tank will work to deepen India’s contribution to international dialogues around intellectual property and access to medicines.

A particular area of concern has been in pharmaceuticals, as India is the world’s supplier of affordable generic versions of drugs that otherwise would be out of reach for public health programmes, treatment providers and millions of people.

We are writing to request that the Think Tank not revisit or challenge democratically-determined and legally-consistent intellectual property rules introduced under India’s Patent Act. We call upon the Think Tank to invest its expertise, time and resources to focus its mandate upon the proper implementation and operationalisation of public health safeguards in India’s patent law.

India has played a pivotal role in supplying affordable generic versions of drugs used throughout the developing world. The availability of ‘fixed-dose combination’ HIV/AIDS therapy (or three-in-one pills) at affordable prices – 1 USD per day – in 2001 revolutionised AIDS treatment, a fact we collectively have witnessed firsthand in many developing countries. Providing this form of treatment adapted to resource-poor settings has only been possible because there were no patent constraints in India on putting these medicines together in one tablet. Currently, over 80% of people living with HIV on treatment in low- and middle-income countries use generic antiretrovirals manufactured in India. As a result of generic competition from India, the cost of first-line HIV treatment has come down by 99%, from over 10,000 USD to approximately a 100 USD per patient per year. HIV/AIDS is just one example. India supplies affordable generic drugs for a variety of medical problems that affect patients, including both communicable and non-communicable diseases.

In 2005, faced with the TRIPS agreement deadline, India once again developed a patent system that protects the need of patients to access life-saving medicines at affordable prices and is consistent with WTO rules.  Specifically, while India has been granting patents on new pharmaceutical compounds since the onset of the a product patent system in 2005, India’s Patents Act also allows patient groups and other interested parties to oppose frivolous or abusive patenting through pre- or post-grant oppositions. India has also been the first country to clearly define strict patentability criteria that prevents a practice known as ever-greening, where market monopolies can be wrongfully granted or endlessly extended.

In 2008, the launch of the Open Source Drug Discovery (OSDD) project by the Ministry of Science & Technology for the first time outlined India’s focus on neglected areas of medical R&D – new TB drugs – long ignored by the pharmaceutical industry. It represented a sincere effort to view innovation outside the narrow prism of intellectual property monopolies through open innovation, open source drug development models and the ‘de-linkage’ of R&D costs from pharmaceutical product prices.

In 2011, the Indian government rejected unnecessary attempts by developed countries and their pharmaceutical sector to agree to additional intellectual property rules in India that would only serve to limit access to affordable medicines without improving innovation on behalf of the public health needs of India. At the height of the EU‐India Free Trade Agreement (FTA) negotiations, Indian negotiators from the Commerce Ministry rejected patent term extensions and data exclusivity as being “well beyond” international trade rule obligations. In doing so, the government stated its position on the issue clearly – “On [the] intellectual property rights issue, whatever is discussed has to be in compliance with the TRIPS commitment,” and made an assurance publicly that instead, India will ensure that the high-quality generic drugs it produces continue to be accessible for all countries[1].

In the last decade India has established a balanced position on the patent system. While India does grant patent monopolies to a number of new pharmaceutical products, it is trying to strike a balance between providing IP protection and having the legal flexibility to protect the right to health. It does so in at least four ways: first, the Indian Patent Office applies strict patentability criteria; second, when deemed necessary in the interest of public health the Indian government grants compulsory licenses; third, Indian courts maintain a balanced approach to IP enforcement; and fourth, Indian trade negotiators reject any IP proposals in FTA negotiations that go beyond the requirements of the TRIPS Agreement. All four approaches are available in the TRIPS Agreement as legal flexibilities.

Public health activists and others have been watching closely in recent months as the pharmaceutical industry and United States Trade Representative’s office steadily and intensively try and press change in India’s patent system towards one that that would dismantle the careful balance established under India’s patent law. Multinational pharmaceutical companies in hand with US Trade Representative (USTR) continue to lobby against: India’s stricter patentability criteria that makes it tougher to get a patent on new forms of existing medicines, any refusal to grant excessive and unwarranted injunctions on claims of patent infringement and discretion of the Patent Controller to grant a compulsory license to a competitor to bring down the prices of medicines that are patented.

In the present context of heightened US pressure on the Department of Industrial Policy and Promotion (DIPP) and the Indian government, we believe that any re-opening of the discussion on patentability criteria, interpretation of Indian patent law and introduction of TRIPS plus standards[2] will be extremely contentious and provide an opportunity for multinational pharmaceutical companies and USTR to take forward their agenda to undermine generic competition from India at the expense of public health safeguards in India’s patent law and its negotiating position in various bilateral and international forums.

We strongly urge you to not allow the use of the Think Tank to revisit decisions made democratically by the Indian Parliament, the Government of India and Indian courts, which could have an incalculable impact upon the lives and access to treatment for millions of people in India and across the developing world.

Any examination of IP issues by the Think Tank must not further undermine access to medicines and India’s standing as the pharmacy of the developing world, on which millions around the world rely.


[1] Anand Sharma Chairs Consultative Committee of Parliament on Challenges in IPR-International and Domestic, Press Release by Ministry of Commerce & Industry, 29 March 2011

http://pib.nic.in/newsite/erelease.aspx?relid=71341

India against inclusion of data exclusivity in any FTA, PTI, 6 April 2011

http://articles.economictimes.indiatimes.com/2011-04-06/news/29388653_1_data-exclusivity-drug-seizure-issue-data-protection.

India—EU free-trade pact could stifle generics industry, The Lancet, Volume 377, Issue 9774, Pages 1305 – 1306, 16 April 2011

FTA: India fights back over its generics, Alliance Sud News No. 70, Winter 2011/12

http://www.alliancesud.ch/en/policy/trade/fta-india-fights-back-over-its-generics

[2] Briefing note, Data Exclusivity and Other “TRIPS Plus” Measures, WHO, Regional Office for South East Asia, March 2006

http://www.searo.who.int/entity/intellectual_property/data-exclusively-and-others-measures-briefing-note-on-access-to-medicines-who-2006.pdf

Re: propriedade intelectual e acesso a medicamentos

Nós, grupos de pacientes, organizações de interesse público, prestadores de tratamento e acadêmicos em todo o mundo, escrevemos ao recentemente constituído IPR Think Tank para levantar questões críticas acerca do sistema de propriedade intelectual na Índia. Parabenizamos a cada um dos membros pela sua nomeação e estamos ansiosos para trabalhar com o grupo para aprofundar a contribuição da Índia em diálogos internacionais em torno da propriedade intelectual e acesso a medicamentos.

Uma área específica de preocupação têm sido os produtos farmacêuticos, considerando que a Índia é fornecedora mundial de versões genéricas de medicamentos a preços acessíveis, que de outra forma estariam fora do alcance de programas de saúde pública que proveem tratamento a milhões de pessoas. Estamos escrevendo para pedir que ao Think Tank que não revisite ou desafie regras de propriedade intelectual estabelecidas democraticamente e juridicamente consistentes, introduzidas sob abrigo da Lei de Patentes da Índia. Apelamos ao Think Tank para investir os seus conhecimentos, tempo e recursos para focar o seu mandato sobre a correta aplicação das salvaguardas de saúde pública presentes na lei de patentes indiana.

A Índia tem desempenhado um papel fundamental no fornecimento de versões genéricas de medicamentos a preços acessíveis, utilizados em todo o mundo em desenvolvimento. A disponibilidade de “combinação em dose fixa” da terapia de HIV/AIDS (os comprimidos “três-em-um”) a preços acessíveis – 1 dólar por dia – em 2001 revolucionou o tratamento da Aids, um fato que coletivamente testemunhamos em primeira mão em muitos países em desenvolvimento. Fornecer esta forma de tratamento adaptado à situações em que os recursos são escassos só foi possível porque não havia restrições de patentes na Índia para colocar estes medicamentos juntos em um único comprimido.

Atualmente, mais de 80% das pessoas que vivem com HIV em tratamento em países de baixa e média renda usam antirretrovirais genéricos fabricados na Índia. Como resultado da concorrência dos genéricos da Índia, o custo do tratamento do HIV de primeira linha foi reduzido em 99%, de mais de 10.000 dólares para cerca de 100 dólares por paciente por ano.

HIV/AIDS é apenas um exemplo. A Índia fornece medicamentos genéricos a preços acessíveis para uma variedade de problemas médicos que afetam os pacientes, incluindo doenças transmissíveis e não-transmissíveis.

Em 2005, confrontada com o prazo do acordo TRIPS, a Índia mais uma vez desenvolveu um sistema de patentes que protege a necessidade dos pacientes de acessarem medicamentos que salvam vidas a preços acessíveis – e que ao mesmo tempo é consistente com as regras da OMC. Especificamente, enquanto a Índia vem concedendo patentes de novos compostos farmacêuticos desde a instalação do sistema de patentes em 2005, sua Lei de Patentes também permite que grupos de pacientes e outras partes interessadas se oponham ao patenteamento frívolo ou abusivo através oposições pré ou pós-concessão. A Índia também foi o primeiro país a definir claramente critérios de patenteabilidade rigorosos que impedem uma prática conhecida como evergreening, em que monopólios de mercado podem ser injustamente concedidos ou prorrogados indefinidamente.

Em 2008, o lançamento do projeto Open Source Drug Discovery (OSDD), pelo Ministério da Ciência e Tecnologia, pela primeira vez delineou o foco da Índia em áreas negligenciadas de P&D médica – novos medicamentos contra a tuberculose – longamente ignoradas pela indústria farmacêutica. A iniciativa representou um esforço sincero para ver a inovação fora do prisma estreito de monopólios de propriedade intelectual – através da inovação aberta, modelos de desenvolvimento de medicamentos de acesso aberto e o “de-linkage” dos custos de P&D dos preços dos produtos farmacêuticos.

Em 2011, o governo indiano rejeitou as tentativas por parte dos países desenvolvidos e seus setores farmacêuticos de introdução de regras adicionais de propriedade intelectual na Índia, que serviriam apenas para limitar o acesso a medicamentos a preços acessíveis, sem aprimorar a inovação em nome das necessidades de saúde pública da Índia. No auge das negociações do Tratado de Livre Comércio (TLC) UE-Índia, os negociadores indianos do Ministério do Comércio rejeitaram extensões de prazo de patentes e exclusividade de dados como sendo “muito além” das obrigações internacionais de regras do comércio. Ao fazê-lo, o governo apresentou claramente a sua posição sobre o tema – “Na questão de direitos de propriedade intelectual, o que for discutido tem de estar em conformidade com o compromisso TRIPS” – e fez uma garantia pública de que, ao invés disso, a Índia vai garantir que os medicamentos genéricos de alta qualidade que produz continuarão a ser acessíveis para todos os países[1].

Na última década, a Índia estabeleceu uma posição equilibrada sobre o sistema de patentes. Enquanto concede monopólios de patentes a um número de novos produtos farmacêuticos, está tentando encontrar um equilíbrio entre a proteção da PI e a existência de flexibilidade legal para proteger o direito à saúde. Isto é feito pelo menos de quatro maneiras: em primeiro lugar, o Escritório de Patentes da Índia aplica critérios de patenteabilidade rigorosos; segundo, quando julga necessário e no interesse da saúde pública, o governo indiano concede licenças compulsórias; terceiro, os tribunais indianos mantém uma abordagem equilibrada para a aplicação da PI; e, quarto, negociadores comerciais indianos rejeitam qualquer proposta de PI nas negociações dos TLCs que vão além dos requisitos do Acordo TRIPS. Estas abordagens são autorizadas pelo Acordo TRIPS como flexibilidades legais.

Ativistas da saúde pública e outros acompanharam de perto nos últimos meses as tentativas firmes e intensas dos oficiais do United States Trade Representative (USTR) e representantes da indústria farmacêutica de pressionar por mudanças no sistema de patentes da Índia de um modo que desmantelaria o cuidadoso equilíbrio estabelecido sob a lei de patentes indiana. Empresas farmacêuticas multinacionais, de mãos dadas com o USTR, fazem constante lobby contra: os rigorosos critérios de patenteabilidade da Índia que tornam difícil conseguir patentes sobre novas formas de medicamentos já existentes; qualquer recusa de concessão de pedidos de patente excessivos e injustificados; e a discricionariedade do Controlador de Patentes para conceder uma licença obrigatória a um concorrente para baixar os preços de medicamentos que patenteados.

No atual contexto de intensificada pressão dos EUA no Department of Industrial Policy and Promotion (DIPP) e do governo indiano, acreditamos que qualquer reabertura da discussão sobre critérios de patenteabilidade, interpretação da lei de patentes indiana e normas TRIPS plus[2] será extremamente controversa e proporcionará uma oportunidade para que o USTR e empresas farmacêuticas multinacionais levem adiante suas agendas, que visam a minar a concorrência dos genéricos da Índia em detrimento das garantias de saúde pública e sua posição de negociação em vários fóruns bilaterais e internacionais.

Nós veementemente pedimos que não se permita o uso do Think Tank para revisitar as decisões democraticamente feitas pelo Parlamento indiano, o Governo da Índia e os tribunais indianos, as quais têm um impacto incalculável sobre a vida e acesso ao tratamento para milhões de pessoas na Índia e em todo o mundo em desenvolvimento.

Qualquer exame de questões de PI pelo Think Tank deve assegurar que não haja prejuízo ao posicionamento indiano sobre acesso a medicamentos como a farmácia do mundo em desenvolvimento, de que milhões no mundo inteiro dependem.


[1] Anand Sharma Chairs Consultative Committee of Parliament on Challenges in IPR-International and Domestic, Press Release by Ministry of Commerce & Industry, 29 March 2011

http://pib.nic.in/newsite/erelease.aspx?relid=71341

India against inclusion of data exclusivity in any FTA, PTI, 6 April 2011

http://articles.economictimes.indiatimes.com/2011-04-06/news/29388653_1_data-exclusivity-drug-seizure-issue-data-protection.

India—EU free-trade pact could stifle generics industry, The Lancet, Volume 377, Issue 9774, Pages 1305 – 1306, 16 April 2011

FTA: India fights back over its generics, Alliance Sud News No. 70, Winter 2011/12

http://www.alliancesud.ch/en/policy/trade/fta-india-fights-back-over-its-generics

[2] Briefing note, Data Exclusivity and Other “TRIPS Plus” Measures, WHO, Regional Office for South East Asia, March 2006

http://www.searo.who.int/entity/intellectual_property/data-exclusively-and-others-measures-briefing-note-on-access-to-medicines-who-2006.pdf

Re: propriedade intelectual e acesso a medicamentos

Nós, grupos de pacientes, organizações de interesse público, prestadores de tratamento e acadêmicos em todo o mundo, escrevemos ao recentemente constituído IPR Think Tank para levantar questões críticas acerca do sistema de propriedade intelectual na Índia. Parabenizamos a cada um dos membros pela sua nomeação e estamos ansiosos para trabalhar com o grupo para aprofundar a contribuição da Índia em diálogos internacionais em torno da propriedade intelectual e acesso a medicamentos.

Uma área específica de preocupação têm sido os produtos farmacêuticos, considerando que a Índia é fornecedora mundial de versões genéricas de medicamentos a preços acessíveis, que de outra forma estariam fora do alcance de programas de saúde pública que proveem tratamento a milhões de pessoas. Estamos escrevendo para pedir que ao Think Tank que não revisite ou desafie regras de propriedade intelectual estabelecidas democraticamente e juridicamente consistentes, introduzidas sob abrigo da Lei de Patentes da Índia. Apelamos ao Think Tank para investir os seus conhecimentos, tempo e recursos para focar o seu mandato sobre a correta aplicação das salvaguardas de saúde pública presentes na lei de patentes indiana.

A Índia tem desempenhado um papel fundamental no fornecimento de versões genéricas de medicamentos a preços acessíveis, utilizados em todo o mundo em desenvolvimento. A disponibilidade de “combinação em dose fixa” da terapia de HIV/AIDS (os comprimidos “três-em-um”) a preços acessíveis – 1 dólar por dia – em 2001 revolucionou o tratamento da Aids, um fato que coletivamente testemunhamos em primeira mão em muitos países em desenvolvimento. Fornecer esta forma de tratamento adaptado à situações em que os recursos são escassos só foi possível porque não havia restrições de patentes na Índia para colocar estes medicamentos juntos em um único comprimido.

Atualmente, mais de 80% das pessoas que vivem com HIV em tratamento em países de baixa e média renda usam antirretrovirais genéricos fabricados na Índia. Como resultado da concorrência dos genéricos da Índia, o custo do tratamento do HIV de primeira linha foi reduzido em 99%, de mais de 10.000 dólares para cerca de 100 dólares por paciente por ano.

HIV/AIDS é apenas um exemplo. A Índia fornece medicamentos genéricos a preços acessíveis para uma variedade de problemas médicos que afetam os pacientes, incluindo doenças transmissíveis e não-transmissíveis.

Em 2005, confrontada com o prazo do acordo TRIPS, a Índia mais uma vez desenvolveu um sistema de patentes que protege a necessidade dos pacientes de acessarem medicamentos que salvam vidas a preços acessíveis – e que ao mesmo tempo é consistente com as regras da OMC. Especificamente, enquanto a Índia vem concedendo patentes de novos compostos farmacêuticos desde a instalação do sistema de patentes em 2005, sua Lei de Patentes também permite que grupos de pacientes e outras partes interessadas se oponham ao patenteamento frívolo ou abusivo através oposições pré ou pós-concessão. A Índia também foi o primeiro país a definir claramente critérios de patenteabilidade rigorosos que impedem uma prática conhecida como evergreening, em que monopólios de mercado podem ser injustamente concedidos ou prorrogados indefinidamente.

Em 2008, o lançamento do projeto Open Source Drug Discovery (OSDD), pelo Ministério da Ciência e Tecnologia, pela primeira vez delineou o foco da Índia em áreas negligenciadas de P&D médica – novos medicamentos contra a tuberculose – longamente ignoradas pela indústria farmacêutica. A iniciativa representou um esforço sincero para ver a inovação fora do prisma estreito de monopólios de propriedade intelectual – através da inovação aberta, modelos de desenvolvimento de medicamentos de acesso aberto e o “de-linkage” dos custos de P&D dos preços dos produtos farmacêuticos.

Em 2011, o governo indiano rejeitou as tentativas por parte dos países desenvolvidos e seus setores farmacêuticos de introdução de regras adicionais de propriedade intelectual na Índia, que serviriam apenas para limitar o acesso a medicamentos a preços acessíveis, sem aprimorar a inovação em nome das necessidades de saúde pública da Índia. No auge das negociações do Tratado de Livre Comércio (TLC) UE-Índia, os negociadores indianos do Ministério do Comércio rejeitaram extensões de prazo de patentes e exclusividade de dados como sendo “muito além” das obrigações internacionais de regras do comércio. Ao fazê-lo, o governo apresentou claramente a sua posição sobre o tema – “Na questão de direitos de propriedade intelectual, o que for discutido tem de estar em conformidade com o compromisso TRIPS” – e fez uma garantia pública de que, ao invés disso, a Índia vai garantir que os medicamentos genéricos de alta qualidade que produz continuarão a ser acessíveis para todos os países[1].

Na última década, a Índia estabeleceu uma posição equilibrada sobre o sistema de patentes. Enquanto concede monopólios de patentes a um número de novos produtos farmacêuticos, está tentando encontrar um equilíbrio entre a proteção da PI e a existência de flexibilidade legal para proteger o direito à saúde. Isto é feito pelo menos de quatro maneiras: em primeiro lugar, o Escritório de Patentes da Índia aplica critérios de patenteabilidade rigorosos; segundo, quando julga necessário e no interesse da saúde pública, o governo indiano concede licenças compulsórias; terceiro, os tribunais indianos mantém uma abordagem equilibrada para a aplicação da PI; e, quarto, negociadores comerciais indianos rejeitam qualquer proposta de PI nas negociações dos TLCs que vão além dos requisitos do Acordo TRIPS. Estas abordagens são autorizadas pelo Acordo TRIPS como flexibilidades legais.

Ativistas da saúde pública e outros acompanharam de perto nos últimos meses as tentativas firmes e intensas dos oficiais do United States Trade Representative (USTR) e representantes da indústria farmacêutica de pressionar por mudanças no sistema de patentes da Índia de um modo que desmantelaria o cuidadoso equilíbrio estabelecido sob a lei de patentes indiana. Empresas farmacêuticas multinacionais, de mãos dadas com o USTR, fazem constante lobby contra: os rigorosos critérios de patenteabilidade da Índia que tornam difícil conseguir patentes sobre novas formas de medicamentos já existentes; qualquer recusa de concessão de pedidos de patente excessivos e injustificados; e a discricionariedade do Controlador de Patentes para conceder uma licença obrigatória a um concorrente para baixar os preços de medicamentos que patenteados.

No atual contexto de intensificada pressão dos EUA no Department of Industrial Policy and Promotion (DIPP) e do governo indiano, acreditamos que qualquer reabertura da discussão sobre critérios de patenteabilidade, interpretação da lei de patentes indiana e normas TRIPS plus[2] será extremamente controversa e proporcionará uma oportunidade para que o USTR e empresas farmacêuticas multinacionais levem adiante suas agendas, que visam a minar a concorrência dos genéricos da Índia em detrimento das garantias de saúde pública e sua posição de negociação em vários fóruns bilaterais e internacionais.

Nós veementemente pedimos que não se permita o uso do Think Tank para revisitar as decisões democraticamente feitas pelo Parlamento indiano, o Governo da Índia e os tribunais indianos, as quais têm um impacto incalculável sobre a vida e acesso ao tratamento para milhões de pessoas na Índia e em todo o mundo em desenvolvimento.

Qualquer exame de questões de PI pelo Think Tank deve assegurar que não haja prejuízo ao posicionamento indiano sobre acesso a medicamentos como a farmácia do mundo em desenvolvimento, de que milhões no mundo inteiro dependem.


[1] Anand Sharma Chairs Consultative Committee of Parliament on Challenges in IPR-International and Domestic, Press Release by Ministry of Commerce & Industry, 29 March 2011

http://pib.nic.in/newsite/erelease.aspx?relid=71341

India against inclusion of data exclusivity in any FTA, PTI, 6 April 2011

http://articles.economictimes.indiatimes.com/2011-04-06/news/29388653_1_data-exclusivity-drug-seizure-issue-data-protection.

India—EU free-trade pact could stifle generics industry, The Lancet, Volume 377, Issue 9774, Pages 1305 – 1306, 16 April 2011

FTA: India fights back over its generics, Alliance Sud News No. 70, Winter 2011/12

http://www.alliancesud.ch/en/policy/trade/fta-india-fights-back-over-its-generics

[2] Briefing note, Data Exclusivity and Other “TRIPS Plus” Measures, WHO, Regional Office for South East Asia, March 2006

http://www.searo.who.int/entity/intellectual_property/data-exclusively-and-others-measures-briefing-note-on-access-to-medicines-who-2006.pdf

Print Friendly

Qual a sua opinião sobre isso?

Receba as novidades da UAEM Brasil!Entrar na lista de e-mails
+ +
%d blogueiros gostam disto: